Summertime stimming and conversations with parents

Summertime in our house is so loud. It’s unbearably loud at times. I understand the need to stim, the happiness, the joy, the excitement. I understand that it is self-regulation and that it helps things. I know that it is important and that the problem with stimming is all in its perception. However, this house is loud.

This summer, Penny and Aiden are louder than Jake. This is partially due to Jake finally understanding and appreciating quiet and time alone. He has taken to playing upstairs in his room with his Lego without anyone else present. This is a major development. As he has now learned to read, he is also happy to sit and read his favorite books endlessly. So much quieter than last year.

But Aiden. Aiden is a yeller. A hollerer, and a stimmer. I still don’t know how much of what he does is learned behaviour and what is his own little personality. When he is mad he is instantly in tears and yelling at the top of his voice. When he is happy he hums. A loud, monotone hum that has no music to it, it is simply a loud hmmmmmm sound. It’s a happy sound, and it always makes me smile because I know how happy he is. We first heard it when he was super small and eating. He would hum that same sound, the exact same tone, while he happily ate. It was adorable.

Penny is learning some words. She can say Mom, Dad, Aiden, Kitty, more, hi, yes, and no. She also manages to vocalize her demands and objections quite clearly without words. She loves to pretend play, much more than either of the boys ever did, and she is super interested in playing dress-up. She is quite social, and super observant. She knows how to unload the dishwasher and clean the toys up. The boys are still learning those things. She knows how to put away laundry and work the iPad as well as anyone. She is obsessed with buckles, and needs them done up all the time. She seems to love doing them up as well as simply knowing that they are done up. She can’t leave a buckle unbuckled.  Currently, she enjoys walking around on her tippy toes and doing whatever her brothers are doing.

So I wonder, where on the spectrum might Aiden fall? Penny? Are they even on it? I don’t want them to face those struggles. And yet, I am not afraid of autism, it doesn’t hold the same intensity or fear over me that it once did. Rather, I wonder about them so that I might know them better, that I might support them better, and love them better. I wonder, because I know all the signs and live with an autism filter on my eyes 100% of the time.

Stuffed animals seated around the room, ‘watching’ their own personal ‘screens’

I recently heard a story a friend of mine tell, for a completely unrelated reason, about a little boy I’ve never met who gets so happy and excited that he bounces and waves his arms behind him. He’s very well-spoken; in fact, he’s almost like a little professor. Based on my experiences, I suggested that she mention to his mom that maybe he should see a pediatrician to be screened for ASD. My friend laughed, saying, there is no way she would want to be the one to suggest that to his mother.

I get that. I really do.

It’s a scary thing to say.

It’s a scary thing to hear.

But I’m now at a point where I am really asking myself, why? And how can I change that?

I asked Aiden’s preschool teacher four times over the past school year if she had any concerns about him. I asked specifics, did he socialize well? Listen to instructions? Make eye contact? I wanted to know. I will ask his kindergarten teacher the same questions. I am not worried about him. I am not concerned that he will turn out autistic. I just want to know what he struggles with so that I can support his teachers, work with him, protect his self-esteem, and help him build relationships. Exactly the same way I feel about Jake.

Penny will be two this September. If she all of a sudden develops regressive autism, I will be surprised. I would be sad, if I didn’t hear her call me Mom again. But it would not change my love, my hope, and my passion for her at all. I would, however, change the way I approach her struggles and her needs.

I want to be able to encourage parents that screening, that investigating, and that understanding their kids is a good thing. It’s doesn’t have to make you feel like a bad parent; it can actually help you to be a better one.

I think the fear comes partially with the feeling that someone else has to tell you. I wish that we could take that part away. The fear, and the feelings of judgement, inadequacy, and defensiveness. Autism Awareness campaigns just haven’t helped with that yet though. More than awareness, we need education, understanding, and acceptance, to the point where moms can talk about it in loving, kind, and accepting tones. And not just with other moms of children with disabilities.

In my house, we do stimming. We are loud. We hum, loudly, and we buckle things up. We love our visual schedule. All of us. I don’t know where we fall compared to other families. I do, however, wish we could encourage and talk with them.

On Therapy and Shame

We are looking for a new behaviour interventionist.  I think I may have found one.  I am hopeful.

We are taking a break from ABA therapy.

I am incredibly thankful for the interventionists who have come and worked with Jake and our family over the past two years.  They have been professional and kind, respectful and wise, and have taught Jake and me so much.  Now we are ready to move on.

I want Jake to learn more in-moment strategies and skills.  I want to avoid tiring him out further and adding to his stress.  I want to see him actually apply some better behaviour skills, rather that learning them, practicing them, and then forgetting or refusing to use them.  My plan is to have someone come and work with us twice a week for a while, once during the day for a few hours and once during the evening.  I want them to integrate and join with us in whatever we are doing that day, and help us negotiate the trouble spots.  I want them to slow us down, so that we have an outsider voice breaking the tension.  I want them to work with Aiden, my husband, and me as much as with Jake, so that we are all learning together how to function better as a family.

I am hopeful.

Really, I want to better support Jake when he is struggling.  I want to slow down my reactions so that I can think clearly and see what is triggering him.  I want to be able to think about autism and what I know about how he works instead of getting frustrated about the behavior and never dealing with the root of the issue.

I want to model for Aiden how to be a friend to Jake.  I want to model for Jake how to relate to his brother and parents.

I read this amazing blog recently.  AMAZING.  I took so much out of it.  She writes about everything I feel and articulates situations I completely relate to.  Her big point, however, is that our medical culture and history treats mental health as something to be cured.  This is not always in the patient’s best interest, as truly, many mental health conditions can never be cured.  Rather, we focus on therapy as a way to deal with, cover up, and mask the underlying condition.

I think that therapy can be incredibly helpful.

We will most likely do more therapy in the future.

However, I believe that therapy has to be done very, very carefully.  The goal of any intervention needs to be helping the person learn a skill that will make their quality of life better without demeaning or attacking their self-esteem or self-value.  Learning ways to communicate is so important.  Forcing children to repeat words that don’t empower them and leave them still unable to explain their intelligence does not help.

The adult autistic community has written much on this subject.  They have totally convinced me that one does not need to be verbal to be intelligent and one can be disabled and still be incredibly valuable in society.  However, when I encounter real life scenarios with other parents at a playground, for example, stigma, judgment, and ableism are prevalent in my town.

Just the thought of talking about autism with other parents is scary.  How do you say, my child is on the autism spectrum, I can see similarities in your child, can we talk about that?  I can’t.  I just can’t.  I can’t even say, I know that there are so many kids these days, with everything from autism to ADHD and everything in between.  What makes your kid special?

What I have learned about autism makes me want to change my community.  We are a lovely community.  Small, but not too small; Christian, but not overly religious; helpful but not too nosy.  And yet, we struggle to change.  I would like to see parents who step up to each other and encourage each other even when they don’t know each other.  I would like to see parents who can say, my child is autistic, it’s nice to see him playing with yours.  Instead of, why don’t you teach that kid some manners?

We need to change the way we look at each other on Facebook.  I know from experience, I have been in tears, and not known how to get help, and posted a status update that says something inane like, “so tired of cleaning, why do they make so much mess when they play.”  If I had actually been on the phone with someone, I would have been crying, explaining what went down that day, how my heart aches and I doubt my parenting, how I love my kids but feel like I’m failing.  We would have cried together, then shared a story, made plans to have coffee or wine sometime soon, and ended the phone call laughing and being made a little stronger.  Brene Brown talks about this idea in her book, The Gifts of Imperfection, when she describes how being vulnerable creates real relationships and conquers shame.

I would like to see dads who listen to moms when they say, “I think there is something going on with our child and I want to have them assessed by a pediatrician.”  I would like to see moms who say, “I can see you are grocery shopping with a child who struggles in busy stores, I get that and you are rocking this.”  I would love it if I could see friends be honest with each other and say, “I can see that your child is showing some autistic traits, you need to talk to someone about it and have your child assessed.  It does not mean you have done anything wrong, there is nothing wrong with getting support, and I will be here to go through it with you.”

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Line up of stuffed animals and toys on a couch. They are happy toys, ready for the day’s events.

I am trying to work all of these ideas together into some sort of presentation I can give to parents of autistic children or even parents in general in my hometown.  I don’t know how to go about it.  Ideas are welcome.  I want to help parents move past shame and fear, get the point that disability and differences aren’t things that change the value of our children.  Parents need to have that point so that we can teach it to our children.  I want Jake to know that being autistic is nothing bad, it’s part of his character, his struggle, that makes him who he is.  I want him to be able to ask for support and be himself without being ashamed or judged.